Escaping Persecution Alone and Finding a New Life

by Adiyah Ali  on December 30, 2010  in

Arian* is an extraordinary young man. In less than four years, he arrived in the United States seeking protection from persecution, applied for asylum, enrolled in college, and mastered the English language. He accomplished each feat alone. “I learned to speak English by listening to people,” he stated with the ease of a young man that is confident in his ability to conquer any adversity.

Arian journeyed to America to escape political persecution directed at his family. Fleeing from violent offenders who did not bother to discriminate between adults and children, Arian came to the United States alone. Once here, just shy of his 18th birthday, Arian applied for asylum – again alone. “Going through the immigration process can be someone’s worst experience ever, especially if you don’t have family or friends to help you,” he recalled. When asked whether or not his family is safe, Arian replied, “I would not use the word ‘safe’. I try not to think too much about what they could be going through. It is too painful,” he stated. “However, my parents were very happy to learn that I was granted asylum, so I would not have to return to an unsafe situation,” he added.


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